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EZ disaster planning

I keep hearing about having a disaster plan. Is it really necessary?

I keep hearing about having a disaster plan. Is it really necessary?

It sure is necessary.  It need not be complicated.  It doesn’t have to take a heck of a lot of time. Just think about the last disaster that you’ve seen or heard about, and that was probably Katrina.  Had those people had the chance to do it over again, they may have done things a little bit differently.  When you are thinking about a disaster plan for you and your family, it need not be complicated.  You are thinking about three things mainly – shelter, food and water, and then your own personal medications or your health.  So think about, as a rule of thumb, being able to be self-sustained in your home for 3 days.  It need not be gourmet.  It could be peanut butter and water, but really for 3 days.  If you have small children, think about 7 days.  You really need to be able to be in your house alone for 7 days without any extra help.  Think about medications, as well, especially if those medications are extremely important to you.  The other thing you need to address is communication.  Have a way to speak to your family members; have a way to communicate.  Cell phones may not work.  Regular phones may not work.  If something happens to your home and you all can’t get back there, think of a place where you’re going to meet and how you are going to communicate.  Not just one place, which is local, but someplace farther away, as well.  And don’t pick a place that everyone else is going to pick, like the local elementary school or a hospital.  Think of a place that you’ve planned, in advance, that you and your family know about, and that’s where you’re going to go.  If you can’t go there, have a secondary place.  That place may be in another state or another city. Also, have someone with whom you’re going to communicate.  It may be your Aunt Bessie that’s another state way, but you’re going to call her, all independently, to check in and let each of you know that the other is okay.  From Harvard, I wish you good health.

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